NINA DE CREEFT WARD | ANIMAL TIES

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Nina De Creeft Ward
Challenger, 2013
Ceramic and Glaze
17 X 12 inches

South Willard is pleased to announce an exhibition of ceramics by Nina De Creeft Ward titled Animal Ties
The exhibition will run from January 5 though February 10, 2020
There will be an opening reception Sunday, January 5 from 3 to 5 pm.

Nina De Creeft Ward grew up in Ojai and Santa Barbara, California in the 1940’s and 50’s.
De Creeft got her first horse when she was 12. She grew up caring for horses, goats and a variety of other animals, as well as being surrounded by the animals indigenous to California. Animals have always been the primary focus in her work and have been the constant thread throughout. Her parents Alice and Jose De Creeft were both artists and Nina never considered being anything other than an artist. In 1956 De Creeft went to Scripps Colege under Paul Soldner and learned to Raku-fire her work, a method she uses to this day. She completed her MFA in sculpture from Claremont in 1964.

De Creeft Ward currently lives and works in Santa Barbara and continues to build ceramic works of the animals she loves. Her most recent works have been ceramic reliefs of coyotes and deer in their native habitat in the Santa Ynez Mountains in Santa Barbara.
Nina De Creeft Ward was featured in a retrospective at the Beatrice Wood Center in Ojai, California and is included in Primal Nature: Animalia by Women in Post-War Claremont, curated by Susan M. Anderson at the Claremont Museum of Art.

January 1st, 2020
SIMPIWE MBUNYUZA | IMBHOKODO

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Ihlongozo, 2019
Stoneware and Glaze
31 X 16 X 16 inches

WATHINTA IMBHUKODO, WATHINTA ABAFAZIL

IF YOU STRIKE A WOMAN, YOU STRIKE A ROCK

Opening Reception: Sunday, November 10. 3 – 5 PM

SIMPIWE MBUNYUZA | IMBHOKODO

November 7th, 2019
JAMES IVESON | DOMESTIC PAINTINGS

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An Exhibition of Paintings

Opening Reception: Sunday, September 22, 4-6 pm
Through November 3, 2019

“to look at it is more
than it was.”

Extract from Robert Creeley “The Immoral Proposition ”

September 18th, 2019
MAGDALENA SUAREZ FRIMKESS | 90

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MAGDALENA SUAREZ FRIMKESS | 90

Opening Reception: Sunday, July 21
4 – 6 PM

In celebration of Magdalena Suarez Frimkess’s 90th birthday South Willard will have an exhibition of solo works made in the last year. Collaborative pots made with her husband Michael Frimkess will also be on view An 88 page monograph will be released on Magdalena through South Willard Press as well as an etching made with Jacob Samuel.

Magdalena Suarez Frimkess
Minnie and Mickey Creamer, 2019
Stoneware and Glaze
4 1/2 X 7 1/2 inches

South Willard will be open by appointment only until Magdalena’s opening July 21

July 13th, 2019
ROBERT RAPSON | NEW WORK

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Andes Royal Mail Line, 2018
Ceramic, Glaze, Wire, Wood
20 X 12 1/2 X 8 inches

Opening Reception: Sunday June 2, 4-6 PM
June 2 through July 10, 2019

May 30th, 2019
Elisabeth Kley and Sanou Oumar

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Elisabeth Kley and Sanou Oumar
Organized by Matt Connors

April 14 through May 26, 2019
Opening Reception: Sunday, April 14. 4-6 PM

South Willard is pleased to present an exhibition of work by Elisabeth Kley and Sanou
Oumar.

Rules can be liberating, a set of limits within which to create. Establishing clear conditions
within their artistic practices, Elisabeth Kley and Sanou Oumar work with self-imposed
restriction in order to build a space for the spontaneous and imaginative to find a platform for
display. Both artists build their artistic languages from something found; for Kley, her research
into historic ornamentation, for Oumar, the found objects he traces in his drawings. This
restriction creates a meditative textural repetition in which moments of disruption intervene to
inform the formal with the personal, the structural with the expressive.

Sanou Oumar’s drawings are built from his set of drawing tools collected from daily life in New
York. Popsicle sticks, washers, a plastic floss pick become simple shapes, circles, lines, curves,
edges, as Oumar traces and rearranges these essential elements into a staggering variety of
compositions. While the shapes originate in found objects, the compositions are deeply
personal. Oumar came to the US recently as an asylum-seeker from Burkina Faso, hoping to
pursue his dream of becoming an architect. The drawings, reminiscent of mandalas, contain
memories, stories and influences from Oumar’s life. One drawing might be imbued with
Oumar’s late mother’s presence, while another, an interpretation of the suspension cables of
the Brooklyn Bridge.

Elisabeth Kley’s ceramic vessels and drawings operate within a limited palette of white, blues
and blacks. Informed by her research into European, Islamic, Byzantine and Asian historic
ornamentation; the motifs on the pieces are powerful, carrying the exotic sensuousness of this
history of visual pleasure. Reflecting Kley’s personal inquiry into desire and the decorative, the
colors, patterns and forms become elements to reorganize and recombine. Through this form
of play, new avenues of enjoyment emerge within this ancient vocabulary.

-Marina Caron

April 12th, 2019
Sylvie Auvray | Coconino

smallserenade

I’M TZITTIN ON THE TOP OF A “WOIL” FIGGATIBLY, SPIKKIN’ – A PRIWILITCH A HONNA A NOBIL “EXPIRRINTZ” “KLIYYO PETTRA ON HER BODGE – DRIFFIN’ DOWN THE NYLON”
AN’ SO, WIT’ ALL THEENGORRA IN ME – I SLUMBA – ? HE DREAMS – HE WALKS IN SHADOWS – AND IN BEAUTY SOME-ONE CAN COME NOW HAS ANY – ONE BEEN AWAY?

– George Herriman
Krazy Kat, 1944

Sylvie Auvray | Coconino
Opening Reception Saturday, February 16. 3- 5 PM
February 16 through March 23, 2019

February 11th, 2019
Michael and Magdalena Suarez Frimkess | Hand Built Ceramics 1958 – 2018

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Michael and Magdalena Suarez Frimkess
| Hand Built Ceramics 1958 – 2018

December 9, 2018 through January 28, 2019

December 8th, 2018
Torbjörn Vejvi | Within Their Shores

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An island can be dreadful for someone from the outside. Everything is complete, and everyone has his obstinate, sure and self-sufficient place. Within their shores, everything functions according to the rituals that are as hard as rock from repetition, and at the same time they amble through their days as whimsically and casually as if the world ended at the horizon.
-Tove Jansson, The Summer Book

September 16 – October 28, 2018

Opening Reception

Sunday, September 16. 3-5 PM

Torbjörn Vejvi | Within Their Shores

September 15th, 2018
DAVID KORTY | TROUT

KORTY INVITE

There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says “Morning, boys. How’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes “What the hell is water?

David Foster Wallace, This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life

JULY 8 – AUGUST 19, 2018
OPENING RECEPTION JULY 8, 4-6PM

Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 12-5
Open by appointment only Monday and Tuesday

* at new location 970 N. Broadway #205, Los Angeles, CA, 90026, 323 653 6153 (Mandarin Plaza)

July 8th, 2018
STANLEY EDMONDSON | HOME AND GARDEN

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STANLEY EDMONDSON | HOME AND GARDEN
APRIL 15 – MAY 17, 2018

April 13th, 2018
Magdalena Suarez Frimkess | New Work

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Magdalena Suarez Frimkess
Minnie Mouses, 2017
Stoneware and Glaze
9 1/2 x 4, 9 x 6, 9 1/2 x 4 inches

February 24 through April 4, 2018

Magdalena Suarez Frimkess | New Work

February 20th, 2018

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January 11th, 2018
SYLVIE AUVRAY | KAT ATTACK

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SYLVIE AUVRAY | KAT ATTACK
Opening Sunday, November 19
2:30 – 4:30 PM

SYLVIE AUVRAY | KAT ATTACK

November 17th, 2017
Insect Armageddon

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
NY Times: OCTOBER 29, 2017

There is alarming new evidence that insect populations worldwide are in rapid decline. As Prof. Dave Goulson of the University of Sussex, a co-author of a new insect study, put it, we are “on course for ecological Armageddon” because “if we lose the insects, then everything is going to collapse.”

The study, which tracked flying insects collected in nature preserves across Germany, found that in just 25 years, the total biomass of these insects declined by an astonishing 76 percent. The reasons for the decline are not entirely clear — and only flying insects were collected, so the fate of crawling insects, for example, is not known — but the scientists suspect two main culprits: the use of pesticides and a lack of habitat in surrounding farmland.

This isn’t the first study to indicate that insects are in trouble. The Zoological Society of London warned five years ago that many insect populations worldwide were declining, and a 2014 study published in Science magazine documented a steep drop in insect and other invertebrate life worldwide, warning that such “declines will cascade onto ecosystem functioning and human well-being.”

The disappearance of creepy, crawly, buzzing insects doesn’t elicit the kind of emotional response that, say, global warming’s threat to polar bears does. Many may be quick to say, “Good riddance!” But we cannot survive in a world without insects, as they are critical for pollinating our food and are themselves a food source for many fish, birds and reptiles. Insects are also nature’s scavengers and soil aerators.

There are proven steps that could be taken now to help stem this decline. Buffer zones of wildflowers and native plants around single-crop fields can help, as can agricultural practices that respect biodiversity and reduce or eliminate the use of pesticides and herbicides. Our planet’s rapidly disappearing forests, wetlands and grasslands need to be preserved and restored wherever possible. More research is also needed to better understand why, where and what insects are disappearing and how they can be saved. But one thing is already clear: The fate of the world’s insects is inseparable from our own.

November 1st, 2017
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